The EU Court of Justice sets aside the first judgment of the General Court annulling a commitment decision and dismisses breaches of the principle of proportionality and due process standards by the Commission (Alrosa)

Alrosa, negotiated procedures and the procedural economy/due process conundrum – one step forward, three steps back?* Friends of the blogosphere: greetings! There was something refreshing in the judgment rendered in 2007 by the General Court (GC) in the Alrosa case (T-170/06). If somewhat excessive in the formulation of some of its grounds, the GC had displayed a clear willingness to control the exercise of the Commission’s discretion in Article 9 (commitments) proceedings and to fill in the legal black hole of the (third?) parties’ due process rights. In doing so, it had endeavoured to go beyond legal formalism and brought its reasoning to a level of transparency not often encountered. The contrast with the position adopted recently on appeal by the ECJ (C-441/07 P) is striking: the

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Auteur

  • European Commission (Brussels)

Citation

Damien Gerard, The EU Court of Justice sets aside the first judgment of the General Court annulling a commitment decision and dismisses breaches of the principle of proportionality and due process standards by the Commission (Alrosa), 29 juin 2010, e-Competitions Due Process Research Program, Art. N° 35697

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