The Shanghai Intellectual Property Court determines whether there are protectable interests and concludes that the degree of damage suffered by the plaintiff is not enough to meet the need for relief through the anti-unfair competition law (Beijing iQIYI Technology / Beijing Sogou Information)

The Anti-Unfair Competition Law of the People's Republic of China stipulates seven types of unfair competition, namely, label confusion (Article 6), commercial bribery (Article 7), misleading statements (Article 8), infringement on trade secrets (Article 9), improper prize-winning sales (Article 10), damage to commercial reputation and commodity reputation (Article 11) and the use of network technology to implement unfair competition (Article 12). However, with the rapid development of the Internet, a large number of untyped unfair competition practices have appeared widely. In China, judicial practice often uses the principle of “honesty and credit” and “business ethics” in Article 2 of the Anti-Unfair Competition Law to solve these untyped behaviors. To measure whether the act is

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Auteur

  • Beijing Foreign Studies University (Beijing)

Citation

Gu Lingyun, The Shanghai Intellectual Property Court determines whether there are protectable interests and concludes that the degree of damage suffered by the plaintiff is not enough to meet the need for relief through the anti-unfair competition law (Beijing iQIYI Technology / Beijing Sogou Information), 10 décembre 2018, e-Competitions Due Process Research Program, Art. N° 91729

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