The Botswana Competition Authority refuses to confirm settlement due to lack of evidence in connection with the respondent’s involvement in the alleged bid-rigging food cartel (Ya Raheem)

Due process arguments come to the fore as the Botswana Competition Authority gears itself for enforcement* In September and October, the Botswana Competition Commission (Commission) took its first two rulings on cartel enforcement. Both rulings have a keen (if not almost exhaustive) focus on due process. Given that due process arguments have tended to be prominent only after a wave of cartel enforcement in more established jurisdictions, the cases demonstrate how developing competition jurisdictions are setting their own learning curves by absorbing the lessons from elsewhere. Having been set up in 2011, the Botswana Competition Authority (Authority) has been primarily active in merger control and has taken a number of prominent decisions, in particular, on the issue of the

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Auteur

  • Norton Rose Fulbright (Johannesburg)

Citation

Mark Griffiths, The Botswana Competition Authority refuses to confirm settlement due to lack of evidence in connection with the respondent’s involvement in the alleged bid-rigging food cartel (Ya Raheem), 17 septembre 2013, e-Competitions Due Process Research Program, Art. N° 61695

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