The US Supreme Court reverses class action certification raising hurdles for antitrust collective redress cases (Wal-Mart Stores / Dukes)

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On June 20, 2011, in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes, the United States Supreme Court handed down its decision holding that discrimination claims on behalf of up to 1.5 million female Wal-Mart employees at 3,400 stores across the United States could not properly be pursued as a class action. The Court’s 5-4 opinion, authored by Justice Antonin Scalia, raises the bar for class certification, holding that putative class members failed to demonstrate by “significant proof” that Wal-Mart exercised a common policy of discrimination sufficient to satisfy the commonality requirement of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23. The Court’s holding that all class members must have the same claim has substantial implications for antitrust class actions. Background The Dukes plaintiffs asserted claims

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Auteurs

  • Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (New York)
  • Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (New York)
  • Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (Washington DC)
  • Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (Washington DC)

Citation

Paul M.  Eckles, Peter E. Greene, Gary A. MacDonald, Steven C. Sunshine, The US Supreme Court reverses class action certification raising hurdles for antitrust collective redress cases (Wal-Mart Stores / Dukes), 20 juin 2011, e-Competitions June 2011, Art. N° 45107

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