The Ontario Superior Court and the British Columbia Court of Appeal debate whether breaches of the Competition Act can support common law claims (Shah / LG Chem - Watson / Bank of America)

Is The Competition Act A “Complete Code”?* Courts debate whether breaches of the Competition Act can support common law claims Recently, Canadian courts have been debating whether the Competition Act is a “complete code” that forecloses the availability of so-called “parasitic” claims, that is, common law and equitable causes of action that are predicated upon breaches of the Competition Act. The issue is important because the Competition Act’s private right of action for damages (s. 36) is limited to actual damages proven to have been suffered by the plaintiff, plus costs of the investigation and litigation. Aggravated and punitive damages are not available, nor is restitution or disgorgement of profits. The provision also contains a two year limitation period that begins to run from the

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Michael Osborne, The Ontario Superior Court and the British Columbia Court of Appeal debate whether breaches of the Competition Act can support common law claims (Shah / LG Chem - Watson / Bank of America), 19 août 2015, Bulletin e-Competitions August 2015, Art. N° 76569

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