The US District Court for the Northern District of California finds that an athletics association’s rules restricting payments to student-athletes violate antitrust laws (O’Bannon / NCAA)

On August 8, 2014, in O’Bannon v. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), Judge Claudia Wilken of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California found that the NCAA violated the antitrust laws by enacting rules that prevented student-athletes from being paid for the use of their names, images, and likenesses in videogames, live game telecasts, and other television footage. O’Bannon v. NCAA, 2014 WL 3899815, at *1 (N.D. Cal. Aug. 8, 2014). Applying antitrust law’s “Rule of Reason,” Judge Wilken found that (1) the plaintiffs could show an anticompetitive effect in a relevant market, (2) the NCAA’s justifications did not support the restraint, and (3) two “less restrictive alternatives” could have achieved the defendant’s objectives. As a result of finding an antitrust

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Michael A. Carrier, The US District Court for the Northern District of California finds that an athletics association’s rules restricting payments to student-athletes violate antitrust laws (O’Bannon / NCAA), 8 août 2014, e-Competitions August 2014, Art. N° 68725

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