Compass Lexecon (Boston)

Elizabeth Xiao-Ru Wang

Compass Lexecon (Boston)
Executive Vice President

Elizabeth Xiao-Ru Wang is an Executive Vice President with Compass Lexecon and specializes in antitrust and intellectual property (IP) issues. She has provided economic analyses in merger review, commercial disputes and regulatory hearings, especially in cross-border matters. Dr. Wang has been involved in casework in a variety of industries, including technology platforms, life sciences, agriculture, financial markets, transportation, and consumer products. She has submitted reports to authorities in China and the United States, and has testified in courts. Dr. Wang has been part of the leadership at the American Bar Association for nearly a decade. She was also named multiple times to the International Who’s Who Legal : Competition Economists list. In addition, Dr. Wang has published and spoken frequently on antitrust and IP issues. Dr. Wang has a PhD in Economics from the University of Chicago in the United States and a B.A. in Economics from Peking University in China.

Distinctions

Auteurs associés

Compass Lexecon (Madrid)
Compass Lexecon (Brussels)
American University’s Washington College of Law (Washington)
Compass Lexecon (Hong Kong)
Compass Lexecon (Chicago)

Vidéos

Elizabeth Xiao-Ru Wang
Elizabeth Xiao-Ru Wang 24 octobre 2014 New York

Articles

528 Bulletin

Elizabeth Xiao-Ru Wang, Dennis Beling China & Mergers : An overview of national case law

528

In the years following the introduction of merger review in China in 2008, China emerged as one of the main jurisdictions for global merger transactions. Today, obtaining clearance in China is often crucial to the overall success of global deals. Merger review in China is therefore a highly relevant topic for companies engaged in global transactions, and for their advisors. We review past merger decisions in the semiconductor industry to illustrate how these events may exacerbate differences in merger reviews between China and other major jurisdictions and may therefore have an impact on global transactions that are notifiable in China. We also look at a development that is of great relevance for transactions in China : merger review in the digital economy. In 2021, the State Administration for Market Regulation (‘SAMR’) published Anti-Monopoly Guidelines for the Internet Economy, which signaled a shift towards increased enforcement in the digital economy, and which has implications also for merger review in China.

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