US Department of Justice (Washington)

Agatha Koprowski

US Department of Justice (Washington)
Trial Attorney

Agatha Koprowski is a Trial Attorney at Department of Justice, Civil Division. Prior to joining the DOJ, Ms. Koprowski was an associate at White & Case. She has experience representing individuals and corporations in complex civil and criminal matters in federal court. Ms. Koprowski also has experience working on investment fund formation and review with White & Case’s Capital Markets group. During law school, Ms. Koprowski interned at the Capital Habeas Unit at the Federal Community Defenders for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania and held several research positions, focusing primarily on issues of criminal justice and international human rights. She was Research Editor of the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Law and Social Change. Ms. Koprowski holds a Master’s degree in Arabic and Islamic Studies from the University of Pennsylvania, where she served as an outreach instructor, teaching Philadelphia area high school and community college students about Arabic and Islam. Prior to law school, Ms. Koprowski lived for several years in Rabat, Morocco, where she taught English and worked at the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative on issues of international legal development.

Auteurs associés

US Department of Justice (New York)
US Department of Justice - Antitrust Division (Washington)
US Department of Justice - Antitrust Division (Washington)
US Department of Justice (San Francisco)
US Department of Justice (Washington)

Articles

288 Bulletin

Agatha Koprowski, Jack E. Pace, Max Shterngel, Owen Pell, Robert Milne, Scott Hershman The New York Court of Appeals holds that state law cannot reach a purely foreign antitrust conspiracy (Global Reinsurance / Equitas)

288

In a decision that may reverberate beyond the antitrust context, New York’s highest court - the Court of Appeals - held that the state’s antitrust statute lacks the extraterritorial scope to reach a purely foreign alleged antitrust conspiracy. The decision could have broad implications for (...)

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