ON TOPIC: ABUSE OF DOMINANT POSITION - LEVERAGE - ADJACENT MARKET - ALGORITHMS - PRICING DECISIONS - GOOGLE

The Google Shopping decision

These three articles provide different perspectives on the European Commission’s decision of 27 June 2017 in which Google was fined €2.42 billion. Google has filed an appeal on 11 September 2017 against this decision. The European Commission fined Google for abusing its dominant position as a search engine. The abuse was defined as an abuse of Article 102 TFEU based on the concept of leveraging, where the dominant position in one market (general search) was used to advantage Google’s product in an adjacent market (comparison shopping).

When demotion is competition: Algorithmic antitrust illustrated Aurelien Portuese Senior Lecturer in Law, De Montfort Leicester University, Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence on European Governance Visiting Lecturer, Centre for European Law, King’s College London I. Introduction 1. On 27 June 2017, the European Commission fined Google €2.42 billion for “abusing dominance as search engine by giving illegal advantage to own comparison shopping service.” [1] Allegedly, Google has algorithmically manipulated the search results of products in order to promote its own platform, Google Shopping, at the expense of competitors. According to the European Commission, it has infringed Article 102 TFEU because it i) “has systematically given prominent placement to its own comparison shopping service”

Access to this article is restricted to subscribers

Already Subscribed? Sign-in

Access to this article is restricted to subscribers.

Read one article for free

Sign-up to read this article for free and discover our services.

 

PDF Version

Authors

Quotation

Nicholas Banasevic, Beatriz Marques, Aurelien Portuese, The Google Shopping decision, May 2018, Concurrences Review N° 2-2018, Art. N° 86714, pp. 25-37

Visites 978

All reviews