The Hong Kong Parliament adopts its first comprehensive competition bill establishing legislation to deal with price-fixing, collusion, abuse of market power, and merger review

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Hong Kong passed its first comprehensive Competition Bill on June 14, 2012. With its passage, Hong Kong now has in place legislation to deal with price fixing, collusion, abuse of market power (akin to abuse of dominance in the EU and monopolization in the US), and merger review (although the merger rule applies only to the telecommunications sector). The Competition Ordinance separates enforcement and adjudication, relying on the Competition Commission for the former and the Competition Tribunal for the latter. Background The discussion of a competition law started almost two decades ago when Hong Kong was under British rule. Between 1993 and 1996, the administration commissioned a series of studies on the state of competition in Hong Kong. When Hong Kong reverted to Chinese rule

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  • Deacons (Hong Kong)

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Sharon Pang, The Hong Kong Parliament adopts its first comprehensive competition bill establishing legislation to deal with price-fixing, collusion, abuse of market power, and merger review, 22 June 2012, e-Competitions Hong Kong Competition Law, Art. N° 66648

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