The EU and Canada sign the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) setting out provisions relating to competition policy

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What does CETA mean for EU and Canadian competition policy?* Introduction With the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) having finally been signed by the EU and Canada on October 30, 2016, it’s worth exploring what it says about competition law and policy and how it may impact these issues on both sides of the Atlantic. Competition provisions Article 17 of CETA sets out the provisions that relate to competition policy. These provisions are meant to underscore that the benefits of trade liberalization secured by CETA are not to be offset or diminished by anti-competitive business conduct. For example, the parties affirm the importance of free and undistorted competition in their trade relations. The parties also commit to take measures to prevent anti-competitive

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Authors

  • Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg (Toronto)
  • International Monetary Fund (Washington)

Quotation

Mark C. Katz, Daniel Schwarz, The EU and Canada sign the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) setting out provisions relating to competition policy, 30 October 2016, e-Competitions Foreign Investment, Art. N° 82419

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