The Spanish Supreme Court rejects applicability of ‘fortuitous discovery’ doctrine when an inspection order is excessively vague (Unión de Empresas de Recuperación)

On February 26, 2019, the Spanish Supreme Court ruled on the Unión de Empresas de Recuperación (“UDER”) appeal against the National High Court’s judgment, which had confirmed a 2014 decision of the Comisión Nacional de los Mercados y la Competencia (Spanish Competition Commission, “CNMC”) fining 13 companies for colluding in the paper and cardboard recycling sector in Spain (case S/0430/12 Recogida de papel). According to the Supreme Court, when the inspection order is too vague, th e ‘fortuitous discovery’ doctrine does not apply. Background In 2014, the CNMC fined UDER and 12 other companies for colluding to fix prices, allocate tenders and clients, exchange information, and agree on commercial

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Maria Lopez Ridruejo, Iratxe Aguirre de la Cavada, The Spanish Supreme Court rejects applicability of ‘fortuitous discovery’ doctrine when an inspection order is excessively vague (Unión de Empresas de Recuperación), 26 February 2019, e-Competitions Exchange of information in associations of undertakings, Art. N° 91361

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