The England and Wales High Court refuses to strike out the conspiracy claim relying upon a cartel infringement on the market for copper plumbing tubes (WH Newson / IMI)

Conspiracy in the CAT: the scope of section 47A* What kinds of “follow-on” claims may be brought in the CAT? ‘[A]ny claim for damages, or any other claim for a sum of money which a person who has suffered loss or damage as a result of the infringement of a relevant prohibition may make in civil proceedings brought in any part of the United Kingdom’, according to section 47A(1) of the Competition Act. A ‘relevant prohibition’ for this purpose is of course defined as any of the Chapter I and II prohibitions or the prohibitions in Articles 101 and 102 of the Treaty. The most obvious section 47A claim is a claim in tort for breach of statutory duty. But what other causes

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  • Blackstone Chambers (London)

Quotation

Tom Richards, The England and Wales High Court refuses to strike out the conspiracy claim relying upon a cartel infringement on the market for copper plumbing tubes (WH Newson / IMI), 19 December 2012, e-Competitions Bulletin Commitment Decisions, Art. N° 59791

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