The Indian Competition Authority organises a two-day conference on issues and challenges in setting up an effective agency, enforcement related to state owned enterprises, public procurement and creation of competition culture (BRICS International Competition Conference)

Quo vadis? Political interventionism in South African competition law* There has been a somewhat startling demonstration of diverging views regarding interventionism in competition matters between emerging and established jurisdictions. During the recent BRICS international competition conference, held in New Delhi over the last few days, FTC chairwoman Edith Ramirez had sought to steer emerging economies away from mixing industrial policy with antitrust law. She indicated that “proper goals of competition law were best solved when a competition authority is focused on competition effects and consumer welfare, and when its analysis is not “interrupted to meet social and political goals.” (Ramirez cited the well-known case of the Wal-Mart / Massmart merger during which a number of South

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John Oxenham, The Indian Competition Authority organises a two-day conference on issues and challenges in setting up an effective agency, enforcement related to state owned enterprises, public procurement and creation of competition culture (BRICS International Competition Conference), 21 November 2013, e-Competitions Bulletin Commitment Decisions, Art. N° 60752

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