The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California deals with a complaint of anti-competitive restrictions preventing payments to basketball players for use of their name, image, and likeness (O’Bannon / NCAA)

Three Questions for the Third Week of the O’Bannon v. NCAA Trial* As the O’Bannon v. NCAA trial enters its third week, commentators are already predicting the fall of the “college sports cartel.” In the case, a group of about 20 current and former college men’s basketball and football players, led by former UCLA basketball player Ed O’Bannon, are alleging that NCAA restrictions, which prevent payment to players for use of their name, image, and likeness, violate federal antitrust laws. They say that by exerting control over the athletes’ publicity, the NCAA deprives athletes of profitable use of their likeness and fixes the price of players’ names and images at zero in violation of the Sherman Act. The players are seeking to

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Amanda Norris Ames, The U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California deals with a complaint of anti-competitive restrictions preventing payments to basketball players for use of their name, image, and likeness (O’Bannon / NCAA), 23 May 2014, e-Competitions Bulletin Commitment Decisions, Art. N° 67253

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