The US Supreme Court recognizes a limited claim for predatory bidding (Weyerhaeuser / Ross-Simmons)

Weyerhaeuser Co. v. Ross-Simmons Hardwood Lumber Co.: The U.S. Supreme Court Recognizes a Limited Claim for Predatory Bidding* Monopsony is the negative image of monopoly. Narrowly defined, it is the structural condition in which a well-specified good or service has only one buyer. [1] But just as a dominant seller is often treated in antitrust law as a monopolist despite the presence of a competitive fringe, a dominant buyer facing some competition is treated as a monopsonist. In most situations, monopoly power is the ability to charge more for a good or service by reducing the quantity sold, and monopsony power is the ability to pay less by reducing the quantity purchased. [2] Although monopoly and monopsony are economically symmetrical, the number of antitrust cases addressing

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Authors

  • Penn State Law (University Park)
  • University of Florida - Levin College of Law (Gainesville)

Quotation

John E. Lopatka, Roger D. Blair, The US Supreme Court recognizes a limited claim for predatory bidding (Weyerhaeuser / Ross-Simmons), 20 February 2007, e-Competitions Buyer power in agreements and abuse of market power, Art. N° 47314

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