The US District Court for the Northern District of California rules that an automotive company breaches FRAND commitments for the standard essential patents it was offering to license (Continental / Avanci)

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As new devices become wirelessly connected, the importance of fairly licensing cellular standard essential patents (SEPs) has become increasingly important. This addition of wireless connectivity into new types of products, however, has created conflicts, as new market participants face unfamiliar licensing demands rooted in historical wireless licensing practices. The complexity of this situation is highlighted by a complaint filed recently in the Northern District of California (Case No. 5:19-cv-02520), in which Continental Automotive Systems, a supplier of cellular components to car manufacturers, sued both Avanci, LLC—a company that pools and licenses cellular SEPs on behalf of member companies—along with some of Avanci’s member companies.

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Alexander Middleton, Kevin J. Post, Steven Pepe, The US District Court for the Northern District of California rules that an automotive company breaches FRAND commitments for the standard essential patents it was offering to license (Continental / Avanci), 5 October 2019, e-Competitions October 2019, Art. N° 96825

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