The EU Court of Justice rejects the argument that the prohibition on the import, sale and use of foreign decoding devices was necessary to ensure compliance with the UK blackout rule (Football Association Premier League)

Premier League fans in Europe worse off after Murphy judgment* When the European Court of Justice (CJ) delivered its judgment in joined cases FA Premier League v QC Leisure and others (C-403/08) and Karen Murphy v Media Protection Services (C-429/08) (Murphy), it was deemed a radical game-changer for the way in which sports media rights are sold in the EU. The doom and gloom scenario has been proven false. Even the Premier League is sticking to the old recipe of licensing its media rights on an exclusive territorial basis in the EU. However, a new competition law issue is looming on the horizon. Prior to the Murphy case, the territorial exclusivity that the Premier League granted to licensees was upheld by a combination of public and private measures. First, national legislation

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  • University of Leiden - Europa Institute

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Ben Van Rompuy, The EU Court of Justice rejects the argument that the prohibition on the import, sale and use of foreign decoding devices was necessary to ensure compliance with the UK blackout rule (Football Association Premier League), 4 October 2011, e-Competitions October 2011, Art. N° 66171

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