The US DoJ requires two merging parties in the aero-engine sector to divest helicopter engine business and to authorize a new third party to provide servicing for certain models of aircraft engines and APUs (GE / Honeywell)

A Merger Denied, 13 years later: The GE/Honeywell Saga* Through COMESA, a regional organization on which this resource has published extensively, African countries have made a significant foray into cross-border merger control. As the world’s competition regimes continue to proliferate, a global understanding and international cooperation are becoming increasingly essential to a coherent worldwide merger-control scheme and parties’ concomitant legal strategy. Introduction [1] Almost 15 years ago, on the eve of Independence Day, on July 3, 2001, the EU Commission decided to prohibit the acquisition of Honeywell by General Electric [2]. The EU Commission’s decision to block this transaction was subject to a firestorm of criticism as the U.S. Department of Justice previously decided not

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Josselin J. Lucas, Sophia Vandergrift, The US DoJ requires two merging parties in the aero-engine sector to divest helicopter engine business and to authorize a new third party to provide servicing for certain models of aircraft engines and APUs (GE / Honeywell), 2 May 2001, e-Competitions May 2001, Art. N° 66182

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