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The US Supreme Court prohibits an association from imposing conditions on its members’ televised events as such conditions violate antitrust laws in the market for college football (NCAA / Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma)

The U.S. Supreme Court declared that the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s (“NCAA”) restrictions on televised college football games should be assessed under a rule of reason analysis, but still ultimately found that the limitations violate the Sherman Act. The Court refused to apply a rule of per se illegality because of the unique nature of college sports, which require some restrictions to ensure competition and offer the product at all. However, the Court found that the NCAA’s pro competitive justifications lacked support in the factual findings and determined the restrictions to be anticompetitive. This case turned on the issue of the NCAA’s ability to limit the televised broadcast of college football games. In the mid-1900s, the NCAA conducted several studies, which

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Katherine Whitehead Miller, The US Supreme Court prohibits an association from imposing conditions on its members’ televised events as such conditions violate antitrust laws in the market for college football (NCAA / Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma), 27 June 1984, e-Competitions June 1984, Art. N° 62474

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