The US Acting Assistant Attorney General Richard Powers delivers prepared remarks covering several criminal enforcement topics including deferred prosecution agreements and engagement with targets on charging decisions

Why I Think the Antitrust Division Should Reconsider Its Policy on No Notice/No Target Letter Indictments* Acting Assistant Attorney General Richard Powers recently delivered (virtually) prepared remarks (here) covering several criminal enforcement topics including: Compliance; Deferred Prosecution Agreements and Engagement with Targets on Charging Decisions. [1] In his remarks about “Engagement With Targets on Charging Decisions” Mr. Powers explains that an individual about to be indicted may not receive notice via a target letter if the Division staff believes defense counsel has not been “interested in meaningful good-faith interactions.” While there have always been exceptions to sending a target letter based on the need for secrecy, it has, to my knowledge, never been the Antitrust

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Robert E. Connolly, The US Acting Assistant Attorney General Richard Powers delivers prepared remarks covering several criminal enforcement topics including deferred prosecution agreements and engagement with targets on charging decisions, 21 July 2021, e-Competitions July 2021, Art. N° 104583

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