The England and Wales High Court holds that even if the need for police services arises from a private event, policing does not constitute a special service when it is performed on land that is not owned, leased or controlled by the event organiser (Leeds United Football Club / The Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police)

Regulating charges for special police services* Police services are generally performed for the benefit of the public at large and provided for out of public funds. However, the police also have the power (under s.25 of the Police Act 1996) to provide “special police services” for which they can levy a charge. To take Northumbria Police as an example, charges can range from £57.98 per hour for a constable to £90.68 for a superintendent. The principal line of defence against such a charge is typically to argue that the service is an ordinary police service, rather than a special service. Such an argument succeeded in the recent case of Leeds United Football

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  • University of Cambridge

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Okeoghene Odudu, The England and Wales High Court holds that even if the need for police services arises from a private event, policing does not constitute a special service when it is performed on land that is not owned, leased or controlled by the event organiser (Leeds United Football Club / The Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police), 24 July 2012, e-Competitions July 2012, Art. N° 60074

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