The European Parliament and the Council indite an area of application for the directive on the award of concession contracts meant to combine the scopes of the directive on public sector awards and the directive on the award of utilities contracts

Directive 2014/23 on concessions and the 'Frankenstein effect'* The more one analyses the content of Directive 2014/23 on concessions (the Concessions Directive), the more one realises that it is full of unnecessary complexities and that it is (unfortunately) a horrible example of the 'Frankenstein effect' that the EU legislative procedure sometimes generates. I am in particular puzzled by Arts 1(2), 6 and 7 of the Concessions Directive, which aim to determine its (personal) scope of application. The difficult exercise attempted in the Concessions Directive is to combine or merge the scope of application of both the Public Sector Directive (2014/24) and the Utilities Directive (2014/25) and, at first sight, looking at Article 1(2), it seems like it achieves that goal (as Richard

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Albert Sánchez Graells, The European Parliament and the Council indite an area of application for the directive on the award of concession contracts meant to combine the scopes of the directive on public sector awards and the directive on the award of utilities contracts, 26 February 2014, e-Competitions Bulletin February 2014, Art. N° 66986

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