Lauren Miller Forbes

Jones Day (Washington DC)
Lawyer (Associate)

Lauren Miller Forbes practices antitrust and competition law, focusing on mergers, nonmerger investigations, and antitrust counseling. She has represented clients from a broad range of industries — including aviation, home products, semiconductors, building materials, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices — before the U.S. Department of Justice, the Federal Trade Commission, and state antitrust enforcers. Lauren counsels buyers and sellers in domestic and international transactions at every stage of the deal process, from premerger planning to regulatory filings, Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission investigations, and litigation. She recently served as antitrust counsel to General Electric in its $3.4 billion sale of GE Water & Process Technologies to Suez, J.M. Huber in the sale of its Silica business to Evonik Industries, and Baxter International’s successful acquisition of generic pharmaceuticals company Claris Injectables; she also defended Electrolux Corporation in DOJ’s challenge to the proposed acquisition of General Electric’s appliance business. Lauren advises clients on a wide range of merger and nonmerger topics, including integration planning, competitor communications, and potential government investigations. She also represents clients in cartel and criminal proceedings, conducting internal investigations, and responding to grand jury subpoenas. Lauren is a member of the American Bar Association’s Section of Antitrust Law and writes regularly on antitrust issues for that organization, most recently as a contributing editor for the second edition of the DOJ Civil Antitrust Practice and Procedure Manual. She is also a member of the Virginia State Bar and the District of Columbia Bar.

Linked authors

Jones Day (Washington DC)
Jones Day (Washington DC)
Jones Day (Washington DC)

Articles

121 Bulletin

Michael A. Gleason, Michael H. Knight, Lauren Miller Forbes, John Magruder The US DoJ and FTC issue guidance on merger review during the COVID-19 outbreak and confirm that they continue to operate despite merging parties expecting lengthier reviews

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The FTC and DOJ have adopted new procedures in response to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The changes are intended to help the agencies stay open during the crisis, but merging parties should expect lengthier antitrust reviews until normal operations resume. All merger filings with (...)

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