Ropes & Gray (New York)

Kevin J. Post

Ropes & Gray (New York)
Partner

Kevin Post works extensively with high-technology and life science companies handling their complex patent disputes. He has litigated patent cases in nearly every significant patent jurisdiction, including the International Trade Commission, the District of Delaware, the Northern District of California, the Eastern District of Texas, the Eastern District of Virginia, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, and the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit on behalf of companies in a variety of technical fields, including telecommunications, electronics, computer systems and software, network architecture and security, e-payments, e-commerce, imaging systems, GPS technology, process control systems, mechanical devices, pharmaceuticals, and biotechnology. Kevin has tried multiple cases involving standard-essential patents and RAND licensing issues, including breach of contract cases. From providing licensing support, patent portfolio analysis and due diligence to handling all aspects of trial preparation and trial, Kevin’s experience has touched on all phases of IP litigation.

Distinctions

Linked authors

Ropes & Gray (Boston)
Ropes & Gray (Boston)
Ropes & Gray (New York)
Ropes & Gray (London)
Ropes & Gray (New York)

Articles

92 Bulletin

Alexander Middleton, Kevin J. Post, Steven Pepe The US District Court for the Northern District of California rules that an automotive company breaches FRAND commitments for the standard essential patents it was offering to license (Continental / Avanci)

58

This article has been nominated for the 2020 Antitrust Writing Awards. Click here to learn more about the Antitrust Writing Awards. As new devices become wirelessly connected, the importance of fairly licensing cellular standard essential patents (SEPs) has become increasingly important. This (...)

Kevin J. Post, Lance Shapiro, Nathaniel Hyman, Samuel Brenner, Steven Pepe, Mark S. Popofsky The US District Court for the Northern District of California finds that a semiconductor company’s "no license, no chips" program violates antitrust laws (Qualcomm)

34

This article has been nominated for the 2020 Antitrust Writing Awards. Click here to learn more about the Antitrust Writing Awards. On May 21, 2019, following a full trial on the merits, Judge Koh of the Northern District of California issued a 233-page opinion in a closely watched case (...)

Send a message