Cristoforo Osti

University of Salento, Chiomenti (Rome)
Professor

Cristoforo Osti is a professor of business law at the Law School of the University of Salento in Lecce, where he teaches antitrust law and private comparative law. He was a Unicredit Professor of European Studies at Columbia Law School in New York in 2014. Among his latest work are: Antitrust: a Heimlich manoeuvre, in European Competition Journal, 2015, 1 and What’s in a name, The Concept of Abuse in Sui Generis Abuses, in G. PITRUZZELLA, G. MUSCOLO (ed.s) Competition and Patent Law in the Pharmaceutical Sector — An International Perspective, Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Cristoforo is a partner at Chiomenti, an Italian law firm with offices in Rome, Milan, and several European and Extra-european countries, where he is the head of the antitrust department.

Linked authors

University Paris II Panthéon‑Assas
University of Würzburg
University College London
Baker McKenzie (Amsterdam)
Hausfeld (Berlin)
Hengeler Mueller (Dusseldorf)
University Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne
Roschier (Helsinki)

Articles

4428 Review

Frédéric Jenny, Damien Neven, Jacques Buhart, David Henry, Thomas Funke, Mathew Heim, Catarina Midões, Nicholas Levy, David R. Little, Henry Mostyn, Ioannis Lianos, Massimo Motta, Martin Peitz, Cristoforo Osti, Almos Papp, Christian Wik, Kristian Hugmark, Julia Vahvaselkä, Antoine Winckler Which competition and industrial policies for the new EU Commission after Siemens/Alstom?

3208

This series of articles presents different points of view about the priorities of the newly established Commission on competition policy in Europe in the aftermath of the decision prohibiting the Siemens/Alstom merger and of the manifesto published by French and German governments. These (...)

Alex Petrasincu, Cristoforo Osti, Florian Wagner-von Papp, Frank Kroes, Laurence Idot Disclosure of evidence included in the file of a competition authority (Implementation of the EU Damages Directive into Member State law - Würzburg, May 5, 2017)

276

The disclosure provisions of the EU Damages Directive allow national courts to order competition authorities to disclose certain documents and information in damages proceedings. In addition, private parties can also be ordered to disclose certain evidence that they have obtained through access (...)

Catherine Prieto, Cristoforo Osti, Florian Wagner-von Papp, Frank Kroes, Thomas B. Paul Effect of consensual settlements on subsequent damages actions (Implementation of the EU Damages Directive into Member State law - Würzburg, May 5, 2017)

331

Hand in hand with an ever-growing amount of cartel damage litigation all across Europe, settlements have become an increasingly important tool for resolving private competition law disputes. However, while the majority of disputes concern infringements committed jointly by more than one party, (...)

Cristoforo Osti, Florian Bien, Florian Wagner-von Papp, Frank Kroes, Laurence Idot Private damages actions before and after the implementation of the Directive (Implementation of the EU Damages Directive into Member State law - Würzburg, May 5, 2017)

622

The majority of Member States have implemented the European Directive on Private Damages Actions for Breach of Competition Law, into their respective law, albeit with some delay. In particular, England, Germany, and the Netherlands, but also France and Italy have faced a certain number of (...)

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