NERA (New York)

Claire Chunying Xie

NERA (New York)
Senior Consultant

Dr. Claire Xie is a Senior Consultant in NERA’s Antitrust and Intellectual Property Practices, where she conducts economic analysis in the areas of antitrust, intellectual property, and commercial damages. In antitrust matters, Dr. Xie has evaluated the competitive effects of mergers and acquisitions, and has analyzed antitrust claims and damages in cases involving alleged monopolization and price fixing behaviors in industries such as agriculture, data management, finance, fuel retailing, pharmaceuticals, and telecommunications. In the area of intellectual property, Dr. Xie has evaluated damages resulting from patent infringement and breaches of contract in the apparel, credit card, and pharmaceuticals industries. Dr. Xie received her PhD and MA in economics from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, where she also taught microeconomics, macroeconomics, money and banking, and Chinese economy. She received her BA in economics and mathematics, summa cum laude, from Agnes Scott College.

Linked authors

Toulouse School of Economics
NERA (New York)
NERA (Auckland)
NERA (London)
NERA (White Plains)

Articles

1131 Bulletin

Sheng Li, Claire Chunying Xie, Emilie Feyler Algorithms & Antitrust: an overview of EU and national case law

1131

Humans have been creating and using algorithms for thousands of years, but never before have the effects of algorithms been so pervasive in our everyday lives and the functioning of the economy as a whole. Recent developments in technologies relating to computer processing power, data storage, and artificial intelligence have enabled the adoption of increasingly sophisticated algorithms that are reshaping competitive landscapes across industries, raising many new questions about competition and antitrust in the process. This article focuses on three areas of antitrust where the use of algorithms has drawn scrutiny from both enforcers and practitioners from around the globe: collusion, mergers, and algorithm self-preferencing.

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