Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (New York)

David Hepp

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (New York)
Partner

David Hepp serves as co-head of the firm’s Financial Institutions Group and leads the firm’s asset management M&A practice. His practice focuses on transactions involving public and private asset management, broker-dealer, wealth management and other financial services firms. Mr. Hepp is a trusted partner and dealmaker for many of the largest asset management firms and has a diverse corporate practice representing public and private acquirers and target companies, private equity firms, management teams and investment banks. These representations have included a variety of U.S. and international mergers and acquisitions, corporate finance transactions, joint ventures, restructurings and other corporate matters. Mr. Hepp has significant experience working with investors and target companies in minority investment transactions. He also represents public companies and their boards in general corporate matters. Mr. Hepp also works with clients in the structuring and/or restructuring of compensation, retention and equity ownership arrangements for asset management and other financial services firms and their principals, both in connection with contemplated transactions and independently to address succession planning and other objectives.

Linked authors

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (London)
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (London)
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (London)
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (New York)
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom (Brussels)

Articles

42 Bulletin

Matthew Collin, David Hepp, Shalom Huber, Matthew Martino, Joseph M. Rancour, David P. Wales, Michael Sheerin, Joseph Penko, Erica Schohn, David Schwartz, Anne Villanueva, Joseph Yaffe, Rachel Kurth, Brittany Blank The US FTC proposes a broad ban on worker noncompete clauses

42

On January 5, 2023, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a notice of proposed rulemaking under the FTC Act with far-reaching implications for U.S. employers. If enacted and enforced, the proposed rule would prohibit employers from entering noncompete clauses with workers, and require (...)

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