Victor D. Vital

Greenberg Traurig (Dallas), Greenberg Traurig (Houston)
Lawyer

Victor is a high-profile trial lawyer who is passionate about providing vital courtroom advocacy in difficult and high stakes cases in courtroom fights across the country, at hourly rates that are competitive with local litigation boutiques. Victor enjoys representing clients who know that, for strategic or other reasons, settlement is not an option and that they need to take their cases to trial. Victor has tried more than 100 cases in his civil and white collar criminal defense practice and as a former state prosecutor in a prominent District Attorney’s Office. Clients trust Victor with their most sensitive, difficult and complex courtroom matters, and lawyers refer these matters to Victor specifically for trial. Victor was inducted into the Texas Lawyer Verdict Hall of Fame for securing the largest Texas employment verdict of 2012 for a corporate plaintiff in a complicated non-compete/trade secrets matter. In 2014, Victor tried a bankruptcy adversary matter and secured a revocation of a bankruptcy debtor’s discharge, reviving his client’s multimillion-dollar judgment. In 2015, Victor secured a take nothing jury verdict against fraud and contract claims arising from a hospital asset purchase transaction, and notably secured a favorable jury verdict on a civil wiretapping counterclaim in that jury trial. Victor is featured in a 2014 Texas Bar article highlighting the correlation between office décor and preparation techniques of successful trial attorneys. Victor also is a civic leader, and a local and national bar leader. From his advancement of and leadership in mayoral priorities and community organizations, to his involvement with important professional organizations such as the highly selective American Law Institute, Victor is relied upon when people and groups need to get things done. Victor has taught trial advocacy at a Texas law school and is currently on the steering committee of the firm’s Trial Practice Group.

Linked author

Baker Botts (Washington)

Articles

216 Bulletin

Elizabeth Wirmani, Victor D. Vital The US Supreme Court overrules 30-year old precedent and declares maximum resale price maintenance agreements should be reviewed under the rule of reason in a case against a gasoline wholesaler (State Oil / Khan)

216

Three years ago this summer, the U.S. Supreme Court abandoned the 100 year-old Dr. Miles doctrine that established a rule of per se illegality for minimum resale price maintenance (RPM) agreements in favor of the more lenient “rule of reason” test. Leegin Creative Leather Products, Inc. v. PSKS, (...)

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