General Court of the European Union (Luxembourg) Catholic University of Louvain

Paul Nihoul

General Court of the European Union (Luxembourg), Catholic University of Louvain
Judge, Professor of Law

Paul is Judge at the General Court since 19 September 2016. His areas of research and teaching are competition law, consumer protection, and European integration. He graduated in law from the Université catholique de Louvain in 1988, holds a Master of Laws from Harvard University (1989) and a Doctor of Laws (1998). He worked as a Legal Secretary at the Court of Justice of the European Communities from 1991 to 1995, and as a researcher at the Université catholique de Louvain from 1995 to 1999. He was Professor at the University of Groningen from 1999 to 2001 then at the Université catholique de Louvain (2001-16). He is visiting Professor at a number of universities, in particular at Paris Dauphine University (2013-16). He is Chair of the Academic Society for Competition Law (2013-16), chief editor of a number of legal journals.

Linked authors

General Court of the European Union (Luxembourg)
General Court of the European Union (Luxembourg)
Catholic University of Louvain
General Court of the European Union (Luxembourg)
General Court of the European Union (Luxembourg)

Articles

1649 Bulletin

Paul Nihoul Consumer protection: an overview of EU and national case law

376

Much has been written about objectives pursued through the application of the rules of competition. But no final or decision conclusion has ever been reached on this difficult topic. The fact of the matter is that competition has existed for ages. It provides a mechanism whereby a structure is establish in societies – a hierarchy among people.

But competition never takes place without rules. The mechanism whereby resources and status are lost or acquired has always been regulated. And the rules applicable to it have an impact on the outcome of the process. Typically: a lenient competition policy will benefit big businesses which are then allowed, implicitly at least, to use their power to maintain or improve their position on markets. By contrast a more stringent attitude will please smaller firms, which will find in those rules a form of protection against predators.

2650 Review

Books

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