Eric S. O’Connor

Sheppard Mullin (New York)
Lawyer (Associate)

Eric O’Connor is an associate in the Business Trial and Antitrust Practice Groups in the Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton’s New York office. Mr. O’Connor specializes in complex litigation, with particular expertise in antitrust, intellectual property, unfair competition, and class actions. He has first-chair trial experience in federal court, including a successful trial to verdict in a copyright matter. Mr. O’Connor’s practice includes all forms of Alternative Dispute Resolution, focusing particularly on international arbitration and also is a Court-appointed Mediator for the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York and an Arbitrator for the Civil Court of the City of New York Commercial Claims. Mr. O’Connor also is the author of a comprehensive chapter on U.S. antitrust and federal civil procedure in International and Comparative Competition Litigation, a treatise comparing the competition laws in over 20 jurisdictions world-wide.

Linked authors

WilmerHale (Washington)
US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) (Washington)
Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy (New York)
Weil, Gotshal & Manges (New York)
Vinson & Elkins (Dallas)
Drinker Biddle & Reath (Washington)
US Department of Justice (Washington)

Articles

397 Bulletin

Craig Zieminski, Eric S. O’Connor, John Gregory Butler, Katherine Ambrogi, Lee Roach, Matthew R. Maddox, Neeraj K. Gupta, Wendy Fu The U.S. FTC requires divestiture of production and intellectual property assets before clearing an acquisition in the market for desktop hard drives (Western Digital / Hitachi GST)

302

On May 8, 2012, Western Digital Corporation (“Western Digital”) completed its acquisition of Viviti Technologies (formerly, Hitachi Global Storage Technologies Ltd., or, “Hitachi GST”) for approximately $4.8 billion, after the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) approved a consent order requiring (...)

Eric S. O’Connor The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York finds that a series of meetings between two credit card companies related to drafting and implementing arbitration clauses was probative of an antitrust conspiracy (Currency Conversion Fee)

95

New York Federal Court Holds That Meetings Related To Drafting Arbitration Clauses May Be Probative Of Antitrust Conspiracy Despite Decision Makers’ Lack Of Knowledge* In In re Currency Conversion Fee Antitrust Litig., 2012 WL 401113 (S.D.N.Y. Feb. 8, 2012), Judge William H. Pauley III denied a (...)

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