Norton Rose Fulbright (Washington)

Amanda L. Wait

Norton Rose Fulbright (Washington)
Partner

Amanda represents clients in antitrust litigation and government antitrust investigations. She represents clients in various industries, including manufacturing, retail, steel, energy, transportation and entertainment in merger and non-merger investigations before the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission. Amanda provides compliance training and counseling to businesses and organizations on joint ventures and competitor collaborations, price discrimination, distributor relations and other competition-related issues. Amanda also represents clients in class action and other complex litigation matters. Amanda draws on her significant experience as a Staff Attorney in the Bureau of Competition, Mergers III Division, of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. During this time, she served as the lead attorney in negotiating consent decrees on behalf of the FTC and litigated numerous challenges to mergers and acquisitions in federal and administrative courts. In recognition of her accomplishments at the FTC, Amanda was awarded an Official Commendation for Meritorious Service. Amanda is admitted to practice before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit and the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin.

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Norton Rose Fulbright (New York)
Norton Rose Fulbright (London)
Norton Rose Fulbright (Paris)
Norton Rose Fulbright (Brussels)
Norton Rose Fulbright (Toronto)

Articles

169 Bulletin

Robin Adelstein, Amanda L. Wait, Richard A. Wagner, Ian Giles, Jay Modrall, Marta Giner Asins The US FTC announces the formation of a working group to examine the US, Canada, UK, and EU agencies’ approach to mergers in the pharmaceutical sector

33

This article has been nominated for the 2022 Antitrust Writing Awards. Click here to learn more about the Antitrust Writing Awards. On March 16, the US Federal Trade Commission, US Department of Justice, offices of US state Attorneys General, the Canadian Competition Bureau, the European (...)

Amanda L. Wait The US FTC imposes conduct remedies before allowing an investment firm to hold simultaneous interests in two competing firms in the market for terminaling services for gasoline (Carlyle / Kinder Morgan)

136

In a recent consent order, the Federal Trade Commission ("FTC") required remedies to address competitive concerns raised by the privatization of Kinder Morgan, Inc. ("KMI") by KMI management and a group of private investment firms. The investigation of this transaction was somewhat unusual (...)

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