The U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals rules that an association may limit the number of available scholarships and place restrictions on those awarded without committing antitrust violations in the market for scholarships granted to student athletes (Agnew/NCAA)

Many of the most impactful cases in the history of sports law are antitrust based. Those cases range from a 1920s foundational case granting baseball’s antitrust exemption to the series of landmark cases evaluating the move by the Raider’s NFL franchise back and forth between Los Angeles and Oakland, to the current day cases resolving sports league labor stoppages. The college

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  • University of Pennsylvania - The Wharton School of Management (Philadelphia)

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Kenneth L. Shropshire, The U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals rules that an association may limit the number of available scholarships and place restrictions on those awarded without committing antitrust violations in the market for scholarships granted to student athletes (Agnew/NCAA), 18 June 2012, e-Competitions Bulletin Sport, Art. N° 62471

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