The U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota declares that locking out employees, who have stopped engaging in collective bargaining and are no longer represented by the union, is not protected under the nonstatutory labor exemption to antitrust scrutiny in the market for professional football players (Brady/NFL)

The recent National Football League (NFL) lockout has put a spotlight on federal antitrust law. After failed negotiations between the NFL and the players’ union (the National Football League Players Association, or NFLPA), on March 11, 2011 – the day that the most recent collective bargaining agreement was set to expire – a majority of the players voted to end the collective bargaining status of the NFLPA because the NFL had threatened to "lockout" the union. The NFLPA player representatives also voted to restructure the NFLPA as a professional association instead of a union. The law has recognized management’s ability to use lockouts as a collective bargaining tool, as a counterpart to a union’s right to strike. [1] By close of business on that same day, the NFLPA informed the NFL that

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Barbara T. Sicalides, The U.S. District Court for the District of Minnesota declares that locking out employees, who have stopped engaging in collective bargaining and are no longer represented by the union, is not protected under the nonstatutory labor exemption to antitrust scrutiny in the market for professional football players (Brady/NFL), 8 July 2011, e-Competitions Bulletin Sport, Art. N° 68033

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