The US Supreme Court restricts the applicability of US antitrust laws with regard to injuries suffered abroad holding that foreign nations can preserve competition without American interference (Hoffman-La Roche / Empagran)

F. Hoffman-La Roche Ltd. v. Empagran S.A.: The Supreme Court Trusts That Foreign Nations Can Preserve Competition Without American Interference* In F. Hoffman-La Roche Ltd. v. Empagran S.A., the United States Supreme Court held that United States courts do not have jurisdiction over claims of foreign plaintiffs arising from foreign anticompetitive conduct outside of the United States unless the injuries giving rise to the claim are suffered in the United States, settling a split among the U.S. federal courts on the issue. [1] In July 2000, U.S. and foreign purchasers of vitamins filed a class action lawsuit in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia seeking damages and injunctive relief under the antitrust laws of the United States, the antitrust laws of the

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Marissa K. Rensen, The US Supreme Court restricts the applicability of US antitrust laws with regard to injuries suffered abroad holding that foreign nations can preserve competition without American interference (Hoffman-La Roche / Empagran), 14 June 2004, e-Competitions Bulletin Burden of proof, Art. N° 43815

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