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Amicus Curiae in the context of EU Regulation 1/2003: An overview of EU and national case law

I. Definition and "Raison d’être" Amicus Curiae, an expression whose first known use is dated in the early 17th century [1], stands for “friend of the court”, that is to say, in general, someone who is not a party to the litigation, but who believes that the court’s decision may affect his interests or purpose. More generally, Amicus Curiae can be defined as an adviser to the court on some matter of law, who isn’t acting as a party, someone who wants to influence the outcome of a lawsuit involving matters of wide public interest or one who assists the court by furnishing information or advice regarding questions of law or facts. To this extent, we should start by underlining that, from the beginning, courts have carefully avoided to defining the perimeters and conditions justifying the use

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  • European Court of Justice (Luxembourg)
  • European Court of Justice (Luxembourg)

Quotation

Georges VALLINDAS, Julie Brohée, Amicus Curiae in the context of EU Regulation 1/2003: An overview of EU and national case law, 2 May 2012, e-Competitions Bulletin Amicus curiae, Art. N° 45411

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