The EU Court of justice revisits forty years of case law on when a dominant company’s rebate scheme may be abusive (Intel)

In its ruling on the European Commission's 500 page Intel decision, in a crisp 150 paragraphs, the EU Court of Justice (the Court) revisited forty years of jurisprudence on when a dominant company's rebate scheme may be abusive. Though no final decision for Intel, the case marks a potentially major departure from the arguably form-based per se (more accurately, "ordo-liberal") approach to rebates advocated by the EU's lower court. The ruling draws together the two lines of debate, looks to blend them together but, in doing so, comes down firmly on the "effects" based side - all an investigated party needs to do is raise the argument, with supporting evidence, that there is no actual foreclosure in order for the Commission to be required to look at the "as efficient competitor"

Access to this article is restricted to subscribers

Already Subscribed? Sign-in

Access to this article is restricted to subscribers.

Read one article for free

Sign-up to read this article for free and discover our services.

 

PDF Version

Authors

  • Baker McKenzie (Brussels)
  • Baker McKenzie (London)

Quotation

Keith Jones, Edward Batchelor, The EU Court of justice revisits forty years of case law on when a dominant company’s rebate scheme may be abusive (Intel), 6 September 2017, e-Competitions Bulletin September 2017, Art. N° 84795

Visites 242

All issues

  • Latest News issue 
  • All News issues
  • Latest Special issue 
  • All Special issues