The European Court of Justice upholds the General Court’s decision addressing the issue of the admissibility of action in state aid cases under the Plaumann test (Comitato Venezia vuole vivere)

Death in Venice: The end of a Commission's locus standi theory in State aid cases?* Following my previous post, I would like to briefly refer to another interesting battlefield within the State aid area: the locus standi of the beneficiaries of aid schemes (think, for instance, of tax measures) to challenge negative decisions of the Commission. In contrast with antitrust practice where undertakings are always the addressees of the Commission's decisions, in State aid cases the addressees of Commission decisions are –in theory- exclusively member States. State aid cases brought before the European Courts by recipients of the aids usually begin with ferocious debates with the Commission on whether the appellants fulfill, or not, the famous Plaumann test.

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Napoleon Ruiz García, The European Court of Justice upholds the General Court’s decision addressing the issue of the admissibility of action in state aid cases under the Plaumann test (Comitato Venezia vuole vivere), 9 June 2011, e-Competitions Bulletin June 2011, Art. N° 37168

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