Joshua D. Wright

George Mason University (Fairfax)
Professor

Joshua D. Wright is a Professor of Law at George Mason University School of Law and holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Economics. From 2013 to 2015, he was one of the five Commissioners of the US Federal Trade Commission. Professor Wright was appointed in 2007 as the inaugural Scholar in Residence at the Federal Trade Commission Bureau of Competition, where he served until Fall 2008. Professor Wright was a Visiting Professor at the University of Texas School of Law and was a Visiting Fellow at the Searle Center at the Northwestern University School of Law during the 2008-09 academic year. He also regularly lectures on economics, empirical methods, and antitrust economics to state and federal judges through the George Mason University Law and Economics Center Judicial Education Program. He received both a J.D. and a Ph.D. in economics from UCLA, where he was managing editor of the UCLA Law Review, and a B.A. in economics with highest departmental honors at the University of California, San Diego. Before coming to George Mason University School of Law, Professor Wright clerked for the Honorable James V. Selna of the Central District of California and taught at the Pepperdine University Graduate School of Public Policy. Professor Wright’s areas of expertise include antitrust law and economics, consumer protection, empirical law and economics, intellectual property and the law and economics of contracts.

Distinctions

Linked authors

U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (Washington DC)
University Paris II Panthéon‑Assas
French State Council (Paris)
ESSEC Business School (Cergy)
Italian Senate
British Competition Authority - CMA (London)
UK Competition Appeal Tribunal (London)
European Commission

Videos

Joshua Wright - US Federal Trade Commission
Joshua D. Wright 29 May 2015 Washington, DC

Articles

141 Bulletin

1716 Review

Douglas H. Ginsburg, Frédéric Jenny, Joshua D. Wright, Thomas Graf Patents: Can antitrust authorities contribute to fixing the dysfunctional patent system? (New Frontiers of Antitrust, Paris, 21 February 2014)

533

This second roundtable of the conference “New frontiers of Antitrust” (Paris, 21 February 2014) was dedicated to the: “Patents: Can antitrust authorities contribute to fixing the dysfunctional patent system?”. This roundtable acknowledges the fact that there is an increasing number of cases at the (...)

Joshua D. Wright FTC v. Actavis and the future of reverse payment cases

273

La Cour suprême des USA a jugé dans l’affaire FTC / Actavis que les accords négociés entre laboratoires pharmaceutiques et génériqueurs au titre des redevances sur brevets (reverse payments) devaient s’analyser au regard de la règle de raison traditionnelle interprétée de manière souple. La décision de (...)

Douglas H. Ginsburg, Joshua D. Wright Antitrust settlements: The culture of consent

456

The beginning of a shift toward a more regulatory and less litigation-oriented regime of antitrust enforcement was observable by the mid-1990s, if not earlier. The transition toward this more bureaucratic approach by antitrust enforcement agencies is the subject of our analysis. Consent decrees (...)

Books

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