Douglas H. Ginsburg

George Mason University (Fairfax), U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (Washington DC)
Professor of Law & Senior Circuit Judge

Judge Ginsburg was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals in November 1986 and served as Chief Judge from July 16, 2001 until February 10, 2008. He graduated from Cornell University (B.S. 1970) and from the University of Chicago Law School (J.D. 1973). Following law school, he clerked for Judge Carl McGowan of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. From 1975 to 1983, he was a professor at Harvard Law School. He then served as Deputy Assistant Attorney General for Regulatory Affairs, Antitrust Division, U.S. Department of Justice, from 1983 to 1984; Administrator, Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB, from 1984 to 1985; and Assistant Attorney General, Antitrust Division, U.S. Department of Justice, from 1985 to 1986.

Distinctions

Linked authors

George Mason University (Fairfax)
ESSEC Business School (Cergy)
Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton (Brussels)
George Mason University (Fairfax)
US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) (Washington DC)
US Supreme Court (Washington)
University of Michigan
Axinn Veltrop & Harkrider (New York)

Videos

Douglas Ginsburg - New Frontiers of Antitrust 2016
Douglas H. Ginsburg 13 June 2016 Paris
Douglas Ginsburg - US Court of Appeals
Douglas H. Ginsburg 29 May 2015 Washington, DC

Articles

132 Bulletin

2610 Review

Douglas H. Ginsburg, Keith Klovers Common sense about common ownership

994

Some scholars have argued that the phenomenon known as common ownership, particularly by large investment managers, is anticompetitive and prohibited by the U.S. antitrust laws. These proponents call for the divestiture of trillions of dollars of equities. We believe the argument for antitrust (...)

Douglas H. Ginsburg In Memoriam: Justice Scalia’s Antitrust Legacy

304

This foreword is an In Memoriam of Justice Scalia. In his 30 years on the Supreme Court, Justice Scalia wrote only three opinions for the Court based directly upon the Sherman Act. In other cases involving antitrust claims, he wrote opinions for the Court resolving the claims based not upon (...)

Douglas H. Ginsburg, Frédéric Jenny, Joshua D. Wright, Thomas Graf Patents: Can antitrust authorities contribute to fixing the dysfunctional patent system? (New Frontiers of Antitrust, Paris, 21 February 2014)

528

This second roundtable of the conference “New frontiers of Antitrust” (Paris, 21 February 2014) was dedicated to the: “Patents: Can antitrust authorities contribute to fixing the dysfunctional patent system?”. This roundtable acknowledges the fact that there is an increasing number of cases at the (...)

Douglas H. Ginsburg, Joshua D. Wright Antitrust settlements: The culture of consent

452

The beginning of a shift toward a more regulatory and less litigation-oriented regime of antitrust enforcement was observable by the mid-1990s, if not earlier. The transition toward this more bureaucratic approach by antitrust enforcement agencies is the subject of our analysis. Consent decrees (...)

Books

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