Kenneth R. Adamo

Kirkland & Ellis (Chicago), Kirkland & Ellis (New York)
Lawyer (Partner)

Ken Adamo is a partner in the Intellectual Property group in Kirkland’s Chicago and New York offices. His practice focuses on all areas of intellectual property law, particularly including patent, copyright, unfair competition, trade secrets, and related antitrust matters. Ken has extensive trial experience as lead counsel in jury and nonjury cases before state and federal courts and before the United States International Trade Commission, as well as ex parte and inter partes experience in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. He has had substantial experience as lead counsel in arbitrations and other alternative dispute resolution proceedings. He also actively practices before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, having appeared in 40 appeals to date. He is registered to practice before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Reg. No. 27,299 (1974) and is admitted to the state bars of Illinois (1975), New York (1976), Ohio (1984), and Texas (1988). Ken has extensive trial experience as lead counsel in jury and nonjury cases before the state and federal courts and before the United States International Trade Commission, as well as ex parte and inter partes experience in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. He also has had substantial experience as lead counsel in arbitrations (ICC, AAA, as well as nonadministered proceedings) and other alternative dispute resolution proceedings. Although acting as lead trial counsel makes up the core of his practice, Ken has an active practice before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, where he has appeared to date in more than 35 appeals, most of which he has argued. Ken has written and lectured on intellectual property law, for both U.S. and non-U.S. publications and organizations, on topics and issues including U.S. permanent injunction/eBay practice, U.S. motion practice, U.S. discovery practice (including e-discovery), International Trade Commission proceedings, reexamination, fraud/inequitable conduct in procuring patents, combined-reference obviousness, cyberart, the doctrine of equivalents/prosecution history estoppel, exhaustion, internet jurisdiction, patent marking, and effects of non-U.S. adjudications on U.S. litigation. He also has written and lectured on a wide variety of trial and litigation issues, skills, and training.

Linked authors

Jones Day (Washington)
Jones Day (Cleveland)
Jones Day (Cleveland)

Articles

982 Bulletin

David M. Maiorana, Geoffrey D. Oliver, Kenneth R. Adamo, Michelle K. Fischer The US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit limits patent misuse doctrine and distinguishes it from antitrust violation (Princo)

982

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit issued an en banc decision with significant implications for the doctrine of patent misuse. The decision issued last week overturns part of a Federal Circuit panel decision last year holding that Philips may have committed patent misuse by (...)

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